Peripheral Nerve Surgery

Upper Extremity

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

Cubital tunnel syndrome, also called ulnar nerve entrapment is a condition caused by compression of the ulnar nerve in an area of the elbow called the cubital tunnel. The ulnar nerve travels down the back of the elbow behind the bony bump called the medial epicondyle and through a passageway called the cubital tunnel.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is a common, painful, progressive condition that is caused by compression of the median nerve at the wrist area. Common symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome include numbness and tingling sensation in all the fingers except little finger; pain and burning sensation in hand and wrist that may radiate up the arm and elbow; and weakness in hand with diminished grip strength.

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Brachial Plexus Injuries

The brachial plexus is a bundle of nerves that originate at the spinal cord near the neck. These nerves innervate your shoulder, elbow, hand and wrist providing feeling and movement.

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Suprascapular Nerve Compression

Suprascapular nerve is a mixed (sensory and motor) nerve that arises from the upper trunk of the brachial plexus. The nerve travels through the suprascapular notch beneath the superior transverse scapular ligament (STSL) of the shoulder and supplies the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles. The primary function of these muscles is to help arm movements at the shoulder joint.

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Radial Tunnel Syndrome

The radial nerve runs from the neck, along the upper arm and forearm, providing sensation and motor function to the hand. At the elbow, it passes through a tunnel comprised of bone, muscle and tendons. Injury, tumors or inflammation can compress the nerve, resulting in radial tunnel syndrome, which is characterized by pain and weakness at the top of the forearm or back of the hand, especially when straightening out the arm. The radial nerve can be decompressed through a surgical procedure called radial tunnel release.

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Quadrangular Space Syndrome

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Axillary Nerve Injuries

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Lower Extremity

Piriformis Syndrome

Piriformis Syndrome is an uncommon rare neuromuscular condition caused by the compression of the sciatic nerve by the piriformis muscle. The sciatic nerve is a thick and long nerve that passes below or through the piriformis muscle and goes down the back of the leg and finally ends in the feet in the form of smaller nerves.

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Sciatic Nerve Injury

Sciatic nerve is the largest and longest nerve in the body. It originates in the lower back, runs along the hip and back of the leg and finally terminates in the foot. Sciatica is characterized by severe pain in the leg resulting from compression or damage to this nerve. The pain is usually present below the knee and may also extend to the foot. The intensity of pain varies from a mild pain to a sharp pounding pain.

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Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel is the gap that is formed between the underlying bones of the foot and the overlying tough fibrous tissue. Tarsal tunnel syndrome refers to a condition where the posterior tibial nerve that lies within the tarsal tunnel is compressed. The condition occurs when the tibial nerve is pinched.

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Groin Pain After Hernia Repair

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Pudendal Neuralgia

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Common Peroneal Nerve Injury

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Saphenous Nerve Injury

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Nerve Tumors

Neuromas

Morton’s neuroma refers to a nerve injury between the toes, usually the third and fourth toes, which causes pain and thickening of the nerve tissue. Compression or chronic irritation of this interdigital nerve is the main cause of Morton’s Neuroma. Excess pressure is exerted on the nerves due to narrowing of the gap between the toe bones causing thickening of the nerve tissue from scar tissue formation. This causes swelling of the nerve and the surrounding tissue.

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Neurofibromas

Neurofibromatosis is an inherited disorder characterized by the formation of tumors on nerve tissue as a result of a disturbance in cell growth. Any part of your nervous system may be involved. The tumors are usually benign and can form in children to young adults. Symptoms depend on the nerves that the tumors compress, and may include loss of motor or sensory function.

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Schwannomas

A schwannoma is the abnormal growth of Schwann cells, which line and insulate nerves. It is usually benign and rarely spreads to affect other tissues and organs, but malignant schwannomas that spread are called neurofibrosarcomas or malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs).

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Nerve Transfers

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